Paul Raff Studio Transforms A 1960s Toronto Dwell

In Toronto, a 1960s dwell on Baby Point Crescent desperately needed some stylish, functional renovations to blossom into the perfect home for a young, growing family.

 

Image Courtesy of Steve Tsai Photography

 

Paul Raff Studio re-imagined this former four-bedroom residence into a compelling - and much improved - three bedroom space that preserves the 'frills-free design-forward' style. The ground floor now features a generous unimpeded flow of 'zones for living', where light flooring creates visual unity, reinforced by the use of soft earth tones. The large windows allow natural light to cascade into the residence, while celebrating the breathtaking treescape vistas of the surrounding Humber Valley eco-system.

 

Image Courtesy of Steve Tsai Photography

Image Courtesy of Steve Tsai Photography

 

One of the biggest transformations was the kitchen. Previously small, utilitarian and enclosed, the kitchen was transformed into the heart of the home, with a family-friendly open plan that puts the resident chef centre stage. The expansive island acts as an anchor of activity, while expansive sliding doors connect the indoors and out - which is essential for kids who like to play.

 

Image Courtesy of Steve Tsai Photography

Image Courtesy of Steve Tsai Photography

 

This reinvention of the mundane into the modern reinforces how reorganizing an original choppy 60s layout into a thoughtful clean-lined space plan can better serve contemporary family life.

Want to learn more about this firm?

See our past post called Falling In Love With The Cascade House By Paul Raff Studio, or click Paul Raff Studio for more information!

 

Researched and Written by Gorana Tolja, Graduate of the Ryerson School of Interior Design & MA Graduate from OCAD University in the Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Histories program.

Posted In: Ontario

Post your comment